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Prosthet Orthot Int. 2011 Mar;35(1):8-19. doi: 10.1177/0309364610393060.

Motion-analysis studies of transtibial prosthesis users: a systematic review.

Author information

1
Institute for Clinical Sciences, Department of Orthopaedics, Sahlgrenska Academy, University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden. david.rusaw@hhj.hj.se

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

Three-dimensional motion analysis has been used since the beginning of the 1980s to evaluate many aspects of physical function of transtibial amputees. Despite its common use for clinical research, there is large variability in methods of capturing three-dimensional data, description of these methods, reporting of joint kinematics and interpretation of research findings.

OBJECTIVES:

The aim of the following review is to critically examine the specific methodologies used by researchers when collecting three-dimensional kinematic data on transtibial amputees and to provide an overview of the methods used.

STUDY DESIGN:

Systematic review.

METHODS:

A systematic review of the literature between January 1984 and June 2009 was conducted. A total of 68 papers were identified for review based on the following criteria: experimental research design, collection of three-dimensional kinematic data of lower-extremity joints, and inclusion of transtibial amputees as experimental subjects.

RESULTS:

A number of methodological shortcomings were identified in the papers reviewed.

CONCLUSIONS:

The authors recommend that future studies more appropriately address the product name and number of prosthetic components used; how the position of reflective markers on the prosthesis is defined; presentation of data from both sound and affected sides; and definition of the neutral position of the ankle when reporting kinematic data. Where possible, the authors recommend use of a control group.

CLINICAL RELEVANCE:

This paper has identified numerous sources of discrepancy and potential error in kinematic data collected on trans-tibial amputees. Clinicians and researchers should make themselves aware of these issues when collecting and interpreting gait data.

PMID:
21515885
DOI:
10.1177/0309364610393060
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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