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Health Qual Life Outcomes. 2011 Apr 20;9:27. doi: 10.1186/1477-7525-9-27.

Implementing patient reported outcome measures (PROMs) in palliative care--users' cry for help.

Author information

1
King's College London, Cicely Saunders Institute, Department of Palliative Care, Policy and Rehabilitation, London, UK. Claudia.bausewein@kcl.ac.uk

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

Patient-reported outcome measurement (PROM) plays an increasingly important role in palliative care. A variety of measures exists and is used in clinical care, audit and research. However, little is known about professionals' views using these measures. The aim of this study is to describe the use and experiences of palliative care professionals with outcome measures.

METHODS:

A web-based online survey was conducted in Europe and Africa. Professionals working in clinical care, audit and research in palliative care were invited to the survey via national palliative care associations and various databases. Invitation e-mails were sent with a link to the questionnaire.

RESULTS:

Overall participation rate 42% (663/1592), overall completion rate 59% (392/663). The majority of respondents were female (63.4%), mean age 46 years (SD 9). 68.1% respondents from Europe and 73.3% from Africa had experiences with outcome measures in palliative care. Non-users reported time constraints, burden, lack of training and guidance as main reasons. In clinical care/audit, assessment of patients' situation, monitoring changes and evaluation of services were main reasons for use. Choice of OMs for research was influenced by validity of the instrument in palliative care and comparability with international literature. Main problems were related to patient characteristics, staff, and outcome measures. Participants expressed the need for more guidance and training in the use of PROMs.

CONCLUSIONS:

Professionals need more support for the use and implementation of PROMs in clinical practice and research through training and guidance in order to improve patient care.

PMID:
21507232
PMCID:
PMC3112059
DOI:
10.1186/1477-7525-9-27
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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