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Mutat Res. 2011 Jun 17;722(2):119-30. doi: 10.1016/j.mrgentox.2011.03.002. Epub 2011 Apr 15.

Low dose radiation response curves, networks and pathways in human lymphoblastoid cells exposed from 1 to 10cGy of acute gamma radiation.

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1
Biosciences Directorate, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, CA 94550, USA. ajwrobek@lbl.gov

Abstract

We investigated the low dose dependency of the transcriptional response of human cells to characterize the shape and biological functions associated with the dose-response curve and to identify common and conserved functions of low dose expressed genes across cells and tissues. Human lymphoblastoid (HL) cells from two unrelated individuals were exposed to graded doses of radiation spanning the range of 1-10cGy were analyzed by transcriptome profiling, qPCR and bioinformatics, in comparison to sham irradiated samples. A set of ∼80 genes showed consistent responses in both cell lines; these genes were associated with homeostasis mechanisms (e.g., membrane signaling, molecule transport), subcellular locations (e.g., Golgi, and endoplasmic reticulum), and involved diverse signal transduction pathways. The majority of radiation-modulated genes had plateau-like responses across 1-10cGy, some with suggestive evidence that transcription was modulated at doses below 1cGy. MYC, FOS and TP53 were the major network nodes of the low-dose-response in HL cells. Comparison our low dose expression findings in HL cells with those of prior studies in mouse brain after whole body exposure, in human keratinocyte cultures, and in endothelial cells cultures, indicates that certain components of the low dose radiation response are broadly conserved across cell types and tissues, independent of proliferation status.

PMID:
21497671
DOI:
10.1016/j.mrgentox.2011.03.002
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
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