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Int J Food Sci Nutr. 2011 Aug;62(5):525-32. doi: 10.3109/09637486.2011.560563. Epub 2011 Apr 18.

Dietary intake is associated with human chronotype as assessed by both morningness-eveningness score and preferred midpoint of sleep in young Japanese women.

Author information

1
Department of Food and Life Science, Azabu University, Kanagawa, Japan. satomito@azabu-u.ac.jp

Abstract

We analyzed the association between dietary intake and chronotype as assessed by both Morningness-Eveningness Questionnaire (MEQ) score and preferred midpoint of sleep in 112 young Japanese women. Dietary intake was assessed by a brief, self-administered diet history questionnaire. A lower MEQ score (evening-type tendency) showed a significant association with a lower energy-adjusted intake of protein, calcium, magnesium, zinc, vitamins (D, riboflavin, and B(6)), and vegetables, and with a higher intake of noodles. Furthermore, a later midpoint of sleep showed a significant association with a lower energy-adjusted intake of protein, cholesterol, potassium, calcium, magnesium, zinc, vitamins (D, riboflavin, B(6), and B(12)), soy, fish and shellfish, and eggs, and with a higher intake of noodles, bread, and confections. These data suggest that evening chronotype is associated with inadequate dietary habits such as low vitamin and mineral intakes.

PMID:
21495902
DOI:
10.3109/09637486.2011.560563
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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