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Dig Dis Sci. 2011 Oct;56(10):2857-64. doi: 10.1007/s10620-011-1679-x. Epub 2011 Apr 13.

Lifestyle change influences on GERD in Japan: a study of participants in a health examination program.

Author information

1
Department of Gastroenterology and Hepatology, Graduate School of Medical Sciences, Kumamoto University, 1-1-1 Honjo, Kumamoto City, Kumamoto, 860-8556, Japan. munmun@kcn-tv.ne.jp

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

Though gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) has been a prevalent disease in Western countries, the incidence of GERD has only just started to increase in Japan.

AIM:

The aim of this study was to determine which lifestyle factors may be associated with GERD in Japan.

METHODS:

A total of 2,853 participants who took part in a health examination program between July 2004 and March 2005 were enrolled. GERD symptoms were assessed using the Japanese version of the Carlsson-Dent self-administered questionnaire (QUEST). The GERD group consisted of participants with a QUEST score ≥6 and/or endoscopic findings. The GERD group was divided into asymptomatic ERD (erosive reflux disease with no symptoms), symptomatic ERD (erosive reflux disease with symptoms) and NERD (non-erosive reflux disease) groups. Associated factors for these diseases were analyzed by logistic regression analysis.

RESULTS:

GERD was diagnosed in 667 (23.4%) participants. Among the subjects placed in the GERD group, asymptomatic ERD, symptomatic ERD and NERD were diagnosed in 232 (8.1%), 91 (3.2%) and 344 (12.1%) participants, respectively. Factors associated with GERD included a high BMI (body mass index), hiatus hernia, fewer hours of sleep, lack of exercise, and drinking green tea.

CONCLUSIONS:

Relationships between lifestyle, gender and GERD were investigated in the present study. Both lifestyle improvements and consideration of gender differences can be used to help prevent GERD development.

PMID:
21487772
PMCID:
PMC3179841
DOI:
10.1007/s10620-011-1679-x
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article
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