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Am J Obstet Gynecol. 2011 Jul;205(1):73.e1-6. doi: 10.1016/j.ajog.2011.02.054. Epub 2011 Feb 23.

Fluid intake and risk of stress, urgency, and mixed urinary incontinence.

Author information

  • 1Channing Laboratory, Department of Medicine, Brigham and Women's Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA, USA. nhmkt@channing.harvard.edu

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

We investigated the relation between total fluid intake and incident urinary incontinence in the Nurses' Health Study cohorts.

STUDY DESIGN:

We measured daily fluid intake using food frequency questionnaires among 65,167 women, who were 37-79 years old, without urinary incontinence at study baseline (2000-2001). Women reported incontinence incidence on questionnaires during 4 years of follow-up evaluation. Multivariable-adjusted hazard ratios and 95% confidence intervals were calculated with Cox proportional hazards models.

RESULTS:

We found no association between total fluid intake and risk of incident incontinence (hazard ratio, 1.04; 95% confidence interval, 0.98-1.10; comparing top vs bottom quintile of fluid intake). In analyses of incontinence type, total fluid intake was not associated with risks of incident stress, urgency, or mixed incontinence.

CONCLUSION:

No significant risk of incident urinary incontinence was found with higher fluid intake in women. These findings suggest that women should not restrict their fluid intake to prevent incontinence development.

PMID:
21481835
PMCID:
PMC3135667
DOI:
10.1016/j.ajog.2011.02.054
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article
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