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Nutr Res. 2011 Mar;31(3):190-6. doi: 10.1016/j.nutres.2011.02.003.

Low-energy cranberry juice decreases lipid oxidation and increases plasma antioxidant capacity in women with metabolic syndrome.

Author information

1
Nutritional Sciences, 301 Human Environmental Sciences, Oklahoma State University, Stillwater, OK 74078-6141, USA. arpita.basu@okstate.edu

Abstract

Cranberries, high in polyphenols, have been associated with several cardiovascular health benefits, although limited clinical trials have been reported to validate these findings. We tested the hypothesis that commercially available low-energy cranberry juice (Ocean Spray Cranberries, Inc, Lakeville-Middleboro, Mass) will decrease surrogate risk factors of cardiovascular disease, such as lipid oxidation, inflammation, and dyslipidemia, in subjects with metabolic syndrome. In a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial, participants identified with metabolic syndrome (n = 15-16/group) were assigned to 1 of 2 groups: cranberry juice (480 mL/day) or placebo (480 mL/day) for 8 weeks. Anthropometrics, blood pressure measurements, dietary analyses, and fasting blood draws were conducted at screen and 8 weeks of the study. Cranberry juice significantly increased plasma antioxidant capacity (1.5 ± 0.6 to 2.2 ± 0.4 μmol/L [means ± SD], P < .05) and decreased oxidized low-density lipoprotein and malondialdehyde (120.4 ± 31.0 to 80.4 ± 34.6 U/L and 3.4 ± 1.1 to 1.7 ± 0.7 μmol/L, respectively [means ± SD], P < .05) at 8 weeks vs placebo. However, cranberry juice consumption caused no significant improvements in blood pressure, glucose and lipid profiles, C-reactive protein, and interleukin-6. No changes in these parameters were noted in the placebo group. In conclusion, low-energy cranberry juice (2 cups/day) significantly reduces lipid oxidation and increases plasma antioxidant capacity in women with metabolic syndrome.

PMID:
21481712
PMCID:
PMC3075541
DOI:
10.1016/j.nutres.2011.02.003
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article
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