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Osteoporos Int. 2012 May;23(5):1623-9. doi: 10.1007/s00198-011-1630-1. Epub 2011 Apr 8.

A population-based analysis of the post-fracture care gap 1996-2008: the situation is not improving.

Author information

1
Department of Medicine, University of Manitoba, C5121 409 Tache Avenue, Winnipeg, MB R2H 2A6, Canada. bleslie@sbgh.mb.ca

Abstract

The post-fracture care gap has not narrowed in recent years. Following an initial improvement, rates of medication initiation have actually declined.

INTRODUCTION:

The current study characterizes temporal changes in post-fracture bone mineral density (BMD) testing or osteoporosis treatment initiation from 1996/1997 to 2007/2008.

METHODS:

A population-based administrative data repository for Manitoba, Canada was accessed to identify non-traumatic fractures in individuals aged 50 years and older. Outcomes included BMD testing or dispensation of an osteoporosis medication in the 12 months following the fracture.

RESULTS:

Thirty thousand nine hundred and twenty (30,920) fracture events met the inclusion criteria; 15,670 affected major osteoporotic fracture sites. Based on either BMD testing or treatment initiation, intervention rates reached a maximum of only 15.5% in 2003/2004, compared with 6.3% in 1996/1997, and 13.2% in 2007/2008 (p-for-trend < 0.001). Post-fracture BMD testing increased from 0.7% in 1996/1997 to 8.9% 2007/2008 (p-for-trend < 0.001). Osteoporosis medication use increased from 6.1% in 1996/1997 to 12.3% in 2001/2002 and then progressively declined to 5.9% by 2007/2008 (p-for-trend = 0.025). Similar trends were observed when only major osteoporotic fractures were included. The initiation of BMD testing or medication varied according to age, gender, geographic region, and income.

CONCLUSION:

Despite increased attention to gaps in osteoporosis management post-fracture in the last 10 years, the situation has not improved: in 2007/20008, fewer than 20% of untreated individuals with a low-trauma fracture received intervention. Novel strategies are required to disseminate and implement best practices at the point of care to reduce the risk of recurrent fractures.

PMID:
21476038
DOI:
10.1007/s00198-011-1630-1
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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