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Postgrad Med. 2011 Mar;123(2):42-8. doi: 10.3810/pgm.2011.03.2262.

Electrocardiographic presentation of left main disease in patients undergoing urgent or emergent coronary artery bypass grafting.

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1
Heart Center, Tampee University Hospital, Tampere, Finland. kjell.nikus@sydankeskus.fi

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

Widespread ST-segment depression with inverted T waves maximally in leads V4-V5 (ie, the global ischemia electrocardiogram [ECG] pattern) is a marker of adverse outcome in patients with non-ST-segment elevation acute coronary syndrome (ACS), perhaps because this pattern is indicative of left main stem stenosis. However, the prognostic value of this ECG pattern has not yet been established.

OBJECTIVE:

We studied the predictive value of a prespecified ECG pattern in patients who underwent urgent or emergent coronary artery bypass grafting (CABG).

METHODS:

We studied the sensitivity, specificity, and predictive values for the global ischemia ECG to predict angiographic left main coronary artery disease. Patients with a 12-lead ECG recorded during anginal symptoms before CABG were included.

RESULTS:

The global ischemia ECG pattern was found in 61 (76%) of 80 patients with and 12 (19%) of 65 patients without left main disease. The sensitivity, specificity, and positive and negative predictive values for left main coronary artery disease in patients with the global ischemia ECG pattern were 76%, 81%, 84%, and 74%, respectively. In multivariate analysis, the global ischemia ECG pattern was strongly associated with angiographic left main coronary artery disease after adjusting for age, gender, diabetes, hypertension, and smoking (hazard ratio, 16.0; 95% confidence interval, 6.5-39.5; P < 0.001).

CONCLUSION:

The global ischemia ECG pattern was strongly associated with angiographic left main coronary artery disease in patients who underwent urgent or emergent CABG.

PMID:
21474892
DOI:
10.3810/pgm.2011.03.2262
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
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