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Mucosal Immunol. 2011 Sep;4(5):519-27. doi: 10.1038/mi.2011.17. Epub 2011 Apr 6.

Mite allergen decreases DC-SIGN expression and modulates human dendritic cell differentiation and function in allergic asthma.

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1
Institute of Microbiology and Immunology, College of Medicine, National Cheng Kung University Hospital, Tainan, Taiwan.

Abstract

House dust mites (HDMs) induce allergic asthma in sensitized individuals, although how HDMs activate immature mucosal dendritic cells (DCs) to render the T helper cell type 2 (Th2)-mediated immune response is unclear. In this study, our results showed a significant calcium-dependent lectin binding of Dermatophagoides pteronyssinus (Der p) extracts to DC-specific intercellular adhesion molecule-3-grabbing nonintegrin (DC-SIGN), the C-type lectin receptors (CLRs) of DCs. Moreover, monocyte-derived DCs (MDDCs) of Der p-sensitized asthmatics (AS) exhibited decreased expression of DC-SIGN, increased endocytosis, and impaired differentiation of DC precursors. The Der p-induced downregulation of DC-SIGN expression in the differentiation of immature MDDCs may be because of the internalization of Der p-DC-SIGN complex. MDDCs of AS produced more interleukin (IL)-6 and less IL-12p70 cytokines when stimulated with lipopolysaccharide (LPS) or Der p than those of nonallergic controls (NC). In the co-culture experiments, MDDCs pretreated with Der p induced GATA-3 expression and IL-4 cytokine productions in naive CD4(+) T cells. These effects of Der p on the differentiation and function of MDDCs could be partially blocked by anti-DC-SIGN antibodies. In conclusion, our results suggest a critical step of allergen sensitization that involves CLRs in the innate immune response of DCs, which may provide a therapeutic or preventive potential for allergic asthma.

PMID:
21471959
DOI:
10.1038/mi.2011.17
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
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