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PLoS One. 2011 Mar 25;6(3):e18069. doi: 10.1371/journal.pone.0018069.

A1C as a diagnostic criteria for diabetes in low- and middle-income settings: evidence from Peru.

Author information

1
CRONICAS, Center of Excellence in Chronic Diseases, Universidad Peruana Cayetano Heredia, Lima, Peru. Jaime.Miranda@upch.pe

Abstract

OBJECTIVES:

To determine the prevalence of type 2 diabetes mellitus, in three groups of Peruvian adults, using fasting glucose and glycosylated hemoglobin (A1C).

METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS:

This study included adults from the PERU MIGRANT Study who had fasted ≥ 8 h. Fasting glucose ≥ 126 mg/dL and A1C ≥ 6.5% were used, separately, to define diabetes. Subjects with a current diagnosis of diabetes were excluded. 964 of 988 subjects were included in this analysis. Overall, 0.9% (95%CI 0.3-1.5) and 3.5% (95%CI 2.4-4.7) had diabetes using fasting glucose and A1C criteria, respectively. Compared to those classified as having diabetes using fasting glucose, newly classified subjects with diabetes using A1C (n = 25), were older, poorer, thinner and more likely to come from rural areas. Of these, 40% (10/25) had impaired fasting glucose (IFG).

CONCLUSIONS:

This study shows that the use of A1C as diagnostic criteria for type 2 diabetes mellitus identifies people of different characteristics than fasting glucose. In the PERU MIGRANT population using A1C to define diabetes tripled the prevalence; the increase was more marked among poorer and rural populations. More than half the newly diagnosed people with diabetes using A1C had normal fasting glucose.

PMID:
21464957
PMCID:
PMC3064652
DOI:
10.1371/journal.pone.0018069
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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