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J Biol Chem. 2011 Jun 3;286(22):19617-29. doi: 10.1074/jbc.M110.175117. Epub 2011 Apr 1.

PRR7 is a transmembrane adaptor protein expressed in activated T cells involved in regulation of T cell receptor signaling and apoptosis.

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1
Institute of Molecular Genetics, Academy of Sciences of the Czech Republic, Prague, Czech Republic.

Abstract

Transmembrane adaptor proteins (TRAPs) are important organizers and regulators of immunoreceptor-mediated signaling. A bioinformatic search revealed several potential novel TRAPs, including a highly conserved protein, proline rich 7 (PRR7), previously described as a component of the PSD-95/N-methyl-d-aspartate receptor protein complex in postsynaptic densities (PSD) of rat neurons. Our data demonstrate that PRR7 is weakly expressed in other tissues but is readily up-regulated in activated human peripheral blood lymphocytes. Transient overexpression of PRR7 in Jurkat T cell line led to gradual apoptotic death dependent on the WW domain binding motif surrounding Tyr-166 in the intracellular part of PRR7. To circumvent the pro-apoptotic effect of PRR7, we generated Jurkat clones with inducible expression of PRR7 (J-iPRR7). In these cells acute induction of PRR7 expression had a dual effect. It resulted in up-regulation of the transcription factor c-Jun and the activation marker CD69 as well as enhanced production of IL-2 after phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate (PMA) and ionomycin treatment. On the other hand, expression of PRR7 inhibited general tyrosine phosphorylation and calcium influx after T cell receptor cross-linking by antibodies. Moreover, we found PRR7 constitutively tyrosine-phosphorylated and associated with Src. Collectively, these data indicate that PRR7 is a potential regulator of signaling and apoptosis in activated T cells.

PMID:
21460222
PMCID:
PMC3103341
DOI:
10.1074/jbc.M110.175117
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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