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Mol Plant. 2011 May;4(3):428-41. doi: 10.1093/mp/ssr017. Epub 2011 Mar 31.

TPC1-SV channels gain shape.

Author information

1
Institute for Molecular Plant Physiology and Biophysics, University Wuerzburg, Julius-von-Sachs Platz 2, D-97082 Wuerzburg, Germany.

Abstract

The most prominent ion channel localized in plant vacuoles is the slow activating SV type. Slow vacuolar (SV) channels were discovered by patch clamp studies as early as 1986. In the following two decades, numerous studies revealed that these calcium- and voltage-activated, nonselective cation channels are expressed in the vacuoles of all plants and every plant tissue. The voltage-dependent properties of the SV channel are susceptible to modulation by calcium, pH, redox state, as well as regulatory proteins. In Arabidopsis, the SV channel is encoded by the AtTPC1 gene, and even though its gene product represents the by far largest conductance of the vacuolar membrane, tpc1-loss-of-function mutants appeared not to be impaired in major physiological functions such as growth, development, and reproduction. In contrast, the fou2 gain-of-function point mutation D454N within TPC1 leads to a pronounced growth phenotype and increased synthesis of the stress hormone jasmonate. Since the TPC1 gene is present in all land plants, it likely encodes a very general function. In this review, we will discuss major SV channel properties and their impact on plant cell physiology.

PMID:
21459829
DOI:
10.1093/mp/ssr017
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
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