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J Infect Dis. 2011 May 1;203(9):1204-14. doi: 10.1093/infdis/jir025.

HIV-1 integrase inhibitor resistance and its clinical implications.

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1
Infectious Diseases Unit, University of Barcelona, Spain.

Abstract

With the approval in 2007 of the first integrase inhibitor (INI), raltegravir, clinicians became better able to suppress virus replication in patients infected with human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) who were harboring many of the most highly drug-resistant viruses. Raltegravir also provided clinicians with additional options for first-line therapy and for the simplification of regimens in patients with stable virological suppression. Two additional INIs in advanced clinical development-elvitegravir and S/GSK1349572-may prove equally versatile. However, the INIs have a relatively low genetic barrier to resistance in that 1 or 2 mutations are capable of causing marked reductions in susceptibility to raltegravir and elvitegravir, the most well-studied INIs. This perspective reviews the genetic mechanisms of INI resistance and their implications for initial INI therapy, the treatment of antiretroviral-experienced patients, and regimen simplification.

PMID:
21459813
PMCID:
PMC3069732
DOI:
10.1093/infdis/jir025
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article
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