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J Laryngol Otol. 2011 Jun;125(6):576-9. doi: 10.1017/S0022215111000090. Epub 2011 Apr 1.

Soft tissue overgrowth in bone-anchored hearing aid patients: use of 8.5 mm abutment.

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1
Department of Otolaryngology - Head and Neck Surgery, The Mount Sinai School of Medicine, New York, USA.

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

To review outcomes following implantation of an 8.5 mm bone-anchored hearing aid abutment, as regards post-operative management of scalp soft tissue overgrowth.

STUDY DESIGN:

Retrospective chart review of paediatric and adult patients implanted with bone-anchored hearing aids between 2003 and 2008 who subsequently underwent revision surgery for excessive soft tissue growth.

SETTING:

A tertiary referral centre and a private otology and neurotology clinic.

SUBJECTS:

A total of 80 patients underwent bone-anchored hearing aid placement between 2003 and 2008. Of these patients, 14 had significant scalp soft tissue overgrowth unresponsive to first-line, nonsurgical local wound care.

RESULTS:

Fourteen patients underwent an average of 2.1 surgical procedures each for soft tissue overgrowth around their bone-anchored hearing aid abutment. The mean time between initial implantation and revision surgery was 13.6 months. Of these 14 patients, 11 were eventually fitted with an 8.5 mm abutment. Following placement of the longer abutment, only one patient required additional surgical reduction of soft tissue overgrowth (mean follow-up time 11.8 months). All patients were able to use their bone-anchored hearing aid.

CONCLUSION:

The 8.5 mm bone-anchored hearing aid abutment is successful in preventing the need for additional surgical intervention in the small but significant number of patients with post-implantation soft tissue overgrowth. Early consideration should be given to this option when first-line soft tissue care is inadequate.

PMID:
21457592
DOI:
10.1017/S0022215111000090
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
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