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Med Princ Pract. 2011;20(3):231-6. doi: 10.1159/000323756. Epub 2011 Mar 29.

In vivo antinociceptive and anti-inflammatory activities of dried and fermented processed virgin coconut oil.

Author information

1
Department of Biomedical Science, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences, Universiti Putra Malaysia, Serdang, Malaysia. dr_zaz@yahoo.com

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

The present study was carried out to investigate the antinociceptive and anti-inflammatory activities of virgin coconut oil (VCO) produced by the Malaysian Agriculture Research and Development Institute (MARDI) using various in vivo models.

MATERIALS AND METHODS:

Two types of VCOs, produced via standard drying (VCOA) and fermentation (VCOB) processes were used in this study. Both VCOA and VCOB were serially diluted using 1% Tween 80 to concentrations (v/v) of 10, 50 and 100%. Antinociceptive and anti- inflammatory activities of both VCOs were examined using various in vivo model systems. The antinociceptive activity of the VCOs were compared to those of 1% Tween 80 (used as a negative control), morphine (5 mg/kg) and/or acetylsalicylic acid (100 mg/kg).

RESULTS:

Both VCOA and VCOB exhibited significant (p < 0.05) dose-dependent antinociceptive activity in the acetic acid-induced writhing test. Both VCOs also exerted significant (p < 0.05) antinociceptive activity in both phases of the formalin and hot-plate tests. Interestingly, the VCOs exhibited anti-inflammatory activity in an acute (carrageenan-induced paw edema test), but not in a chronic (cotton-pellet-induced granuloma test) model of inflammation.

CONCLUSION:

The MARDI-produced VCOs possessed antinociceptive and anti-inflammatory activities. Further studies are needed to confirm these observations.

PMID:
21454992
DOI:
10.1159/000323756
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
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