Format

Send to

Choose Destination
Vet J. 2011 Nov;190(2):e78-83. doi: 10.1016/j.tvjl.2011.02.025. Epub 2011 Mar 31.

Hemostatic abnormalities in dogs with carcinoma: a thromboelastographic characterization of hypercoagulability.

Author information

1
Department of Veterinary Clinical Sciences, The Ohio State University, Columbus, OH 43210, USA. psaavedr@cvm.msu.edu

Abstract

Hemostatic abnormalities were investigated in 32 dogs with carcinoma and 19 age-matched healthy dogs. Thromboelastography, hemostasis profile (i.e. prothrombin time [PT], activated partial thromboplastin time [aPTT], fibrinogen concentration), platelet count (PLT), thrombin-antithrombin complexes (TAT), and plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 (PAI-1) activity were evaluated. Dogs with carcinomas had faster thrombus generation (TEG(TG), a mathematic value obtained from the first derivate of the thromboelastographic tracing; 834.8±91.1 vs. 707.8±75.8mm/min; mean±SD), increased fibrinogen concentration (276 vs. 151mg/dL), and PLT (425 vs. 324U×10(9)/L), but had decreased PAI-1 activity (15.7 vs. 26.2IU/mL).The most common hemostatic abnormalities found in carcinoma dogs were hypercoagulability (TEG(TG)>mean+2 SD of healthy dogs) and thrombocytosis (PLT>424×10(9)U/L) in 46% of cases, and hyperfibrinogenemia (fibrinogen >384mg/dL) in 32% of cases. Disseminated intravascular coagulation was uncommon and the extent of disease was not correlated with hypercoagulability. TEG(TG) showed good correlation with fibrinogen (r=0.80) and hyperfibrinogenemia seems to be a main factor of the hypercoagulable state in carcinoma dogs. In conclusion, TEG(TG) is a valid parameter to diagnose hypercoagulability.

PMID:
21454111
DOI:
10.1016/j.tvjl.2011.02.025
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

Supplemental Content

Full text links

Icon for Elsevier Science
Loading ...
Support Center