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Pediatr Clin North Am. 2011 Apr;58(2):377-88, x. doi: 10.1016/j.pcl.2011.02.006. Epub 2011 Mar 5.

Recognition and management of food-induced anaphylaxis.

Author information

1
Division of Pediatric Allergy and Immunology, Department of Pediatrics, Johns Hopkins School of Medicine, CMSC 1102, 600 North Wolfe Street, Baltimore, MD 21287, USA. ckeet1@jhmi.edu

Abstract

Food-induced anaphylactic reactions are common and increasing in frequency. Despite the existence of a consensus definition of anaphylaxis, many cases are missed, recommended treatments are not given, and follow-up is inadequate. New aspects of its pathophysiology and causes, including atypical food-induced causes, are still being uncovered. Epinephrine remains the cornerstone for successfully treating anaphylaxis; H1 and H2 antihistamines, glucocorticoids, and β-agonists are ancillary medications that may be used in addition to epinephrine. Early recognition of anaphylaxis, appropriate emergency treatment, and follow up, including prescription of self-injectable epinephrine, are essential to prevent death and significant morbidity from anaphylaxis.

PMID:
21453808
PMCID:
PMC3096462
DOI:
10.1016/j.pcl.2011.02.006
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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