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J Infect Dis. 2011 Apr 15;203(8):1182-91. doi: 10.1093/infdis/jiq172.

Increases in human papillomavirus detection during early HIV infection among women in Zimbabwe.

Author information

1
Bloomberg School of Public Health, Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, Maryland 21205, USA.

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

Individuals who acquire human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) may experience an immediate disruption of genital tract immunity, altering the ability to mount a local and effective immune response. This study examined the impact of early HIV infection on new detection of human papillomavirus (HPV).

METHODS:

One hundred fifty-five Zimbabwean women with observation periods before and after HIV acquisition and 486 HIV-uninfected women were selected from a cohort study evaluating hormonal contraceptive use and risk of HIV acquisition. Study visits occurred at 3-month intervals. Cervical swab samples available from up to 6 months before, at, and up to 6 months after the visit when HIV was first detected were typed for 37 HPV genotypes or subtypes.

RESULTS:

We observed ∼5-fold higher odds of multiple (≥2) new HPV detections only after HIV acquisition, relative to HIV-negative women after adjusting for sexual behavior and concurrent genital tract infections. We also observed ∼2.5-fold higher odds of single new HPV detections at visits before and after HIV acquisition, relative to HIV-uninfected women in multivariable models.

CONCLUSIONS:

These findings suggest that HIV infection has an immediate impact on genital tract immunity, as evidenced by the high risk of multiple new HPV detections immediately after HIV acquisition.

PMID:
21451006
PMCID:
PMC3068021
DOI:
10.1093/infdis/jiq172
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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