Format

Send to

Choose Destination
See comment in PubMed Commons below
J Am Med Dir Assoc. 2011 Nov;12(9):678-84. doi: 10.1016/j.jamda.2010.05.002. Epub 2010 Oct 2.

Increasing influenza and pneumococcal immunization rates in a nursing home network.

Author information

1
Division of Geriatric Medicine, Department of Medicine, School of Medicine, University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, PA 15213, USA. naceda@upmc.edu

Abstract

INTRODUCTION AND RATIONALE:

Influenza and pneumonia remain serious health concerns for long-term care (LTC) residents. Vaccination of LTC residents and health care workers are reasonable preventive strategies, although most facilities fall short of Healthy People 2010 goals. Improving immunization rates across multiple LTC facilities remains an elusive challenge. This quality improvement study sought to improve immunization rates across 6 LTC facilities and identify persistent barriers to better performance.

METHODS:

In 2002, 6 facilities associated with the University of Pittsburgh Institute on Aging established a quality improvement network addressing immunization rates. The facilities were provided with a written educational toolkit and shared information through an e-mail distribution list. To help determine optimal program structure in future years, 3 of the facilities participated in a single half-day collaborative training session. Change in immunization rates from baseline to year 2 were compared between those participating in the collaborative training and those not participating. Barriers to improved performance were sought from all groups through focus group analysis.

RESULTS:

Facilities participating in the single collaborative training program improved immunization rates modestly, whereas facilities not participating in the collaborative training saw decreases in immunization rates. Staff turnover was cited as a significant barrier to improved performance.

DISCUSSION:

It may be possible to improve immunization rates in LTC facilities, at least modestly, using a collaborative training process. Staff turnover may be an important barrier to improved LTC immunization rates.

PMID:
21450182
PMCID:
PMC4893952
DOI:
10.1016/j.jamda.2010.05.002
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article
PubMed Commons home

PubMed Commons

0 comments
How to join PubMed Commons

    Supplemental Content

    Full text links

    Icon for Elsevier Science Icon for PubMed Central
    Loading ...
    Support Center