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J Am Med Dir Assoc. 2011 Sep;12(7):499-507. doi: 10.1016/j.jamda.2010.03.011. Epub 2010 Oct 2.

A multifaceted intervention to implement guidelines did not affect hospitalization rates for nursing home-acquired pneumonia.

Author information

1
Denver VA Medical Center, CO 80220, USA. evelyn.hutt@ucdenver.edu

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

Determine whether a comprehensive approach to implementing national consensus guidelines for nursing home-acquired pneumonia (NHAP) affected hospitalization rates.

DESIGN:

Quasi-experimental, mixed-methods, multifaceted, unblinded intervention trial.

SETTING:

Sixteen nursing homes (NHs) from 1 corporation: 8 in metropolitan Denver, CO; 8 in Kansas and Missouri during 3 influenza seasons, October to April 2004 to 2007.

PARTICIPANTS:

Residents with 2 or more signs and symptoms of systemic lower respiratory tract infection (LRTI); NH staff and physicians were eligible.

INTERVENTION:

Multifaceted, including academic detailing to clinicians, within-facility nurse change agent, financial incentives, and nursing education.

MEASUREMENTS:

Subjects' NH medical records were reviewed for resident characteristics, disease severity, and care processes. Bivariate analysis compared hospitalization rates for subjects with stable and unstable vital signs between intervention and control NHs and time periods. Qualitative interviews were analyzed using content coding.

RESULTS:

Hospitalization rates for stable residents in both NH groups remained low throughout the study. Few critically ill subjects in the intervention NHs were hospitalized in either the baseline or intervention period. In control NHs, 8.7% of subjects with unstable vital signs were hospitalized during the baseline and 33% in intervention year 2, but the difference was not statistically significant (P = .10). Interviews with nursing staff and leadership confirmed there were significant pressures for, and enablers of, avoiding hospitalization for treatment of acute infections.

CONCLUSIONS:

Secular pressures to avoid hospitalization and the challenges of reaching NH physicians via academic detailing are likely responsible for the lack of intervention effect on hospitalization rates for critically ill NH residents.

PMID:
21450174
DOI:
10.1016/j.jamda.2010.03.011
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
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