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Scand J Gastroenterol. 2011 Jul;46(7-8):941-8. doi: 10.3109/00365521.2011.568521. Epub 2011 Mar 28.

Impact of the MELD allocation after its implementation in liver transplantation.

Author information

1
Department of Visceral, Transplantation, Thoracic and Vascular Surgery, Universitätsklinikum Leipzig, Leipzig, Germany. christoph.benckert@medizin.uni-leipzig.de

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

On 16 December 2006, most Eurotransplant countries changed waiting time oriented liver allocation policy to the urgency oriented Model for End-stage Liver Disease (MELD) system. There are limited data on the effects of this policy change within the Eurotransplant community.

PATIENTS AND METHODS:

A total of 154 patients who had undergone deceased donor liver transplantation (LT) were retrospectively analyzed in three time periods: period A (1-year pre-MELD, n = 42) versus period B (1-year post-MELD, n = 52) versus period C (2 years after MELD implementation, n = 60).

RESULTS:

The median MELD score at the time of LT increased from 16.3 points in period A to 22.4 and 20.4 in periods B and C, respectively (p = 0.007). Waitlist mortality decreased from 18.4% in period A to 10.4% and 9.4% in periods B and C, respectively (p = 0.015). Three-month mortality did not change significantly (10% each for periods A, B and C). One-year survival was 84% for the MELD 6-19 group compared with 81% in the MELD 20-29 group and 74% in the MELD ‚Č•30 group (p = 0.823). Analyzing MELD score and previously described prognostic scores [i.e. survival after liver transplantation (SALT) score and donor-MELD (D-MELD) score] with regard to 1-year survival, only a high risk SALT score was predictive (p = 0.038). In our center, 2 years after implementation of the MELD system, waitlist mortality decreased, while 90-day mortality did not change significantly.

CONCLUSION:

Up to now, only the SALT score proved to be of prognostic relevance post-transplant.

PMID:
21443420
DOI:
10.3109/00365521.2011.568521
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
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