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Addiction. 2011 Sep;106(9):1603-11. doi: 10.1111/j.1360-0443.2011.03445.x.

Surveying the range and magnitude of alcohol's harm to others in Australia.

Author information

1
AER Centre for Alcohol Policy Research, Turning Point Alcohol and Drug Centre, Fitzroy, VIC, Australia. anne-mariel@turningpoint.org.au

Abstract

AIMS:

This study aims to document the adverse effects of drinkers in Australia on people other than the drinker.

DESIGN:

Cross-sectional survey.

SETTING:

In a national survey of Australia, respondents described the harmful effects they experienced from drinkers in their households, family and friendship networks, as well as work-place and community settings.

PARTICIPANTS:

A randomly selected sample of 2,649 adult Australians.

MEASUREMENTS:

Problems experienced because of others' drinking were ascertained via computer-assisted telephone interviews. Respondent and drinker socio-demographic and drinking pattern data were recorded.

FINDINGS:

A total of 70% of respondents were affected by strangers' drinking and experienced nuisance, fear or abuse, and 30% reported that the drinking of someone close to them had negative effects, although only 11% were affected by such a person 'a lot'. Women were more affected by someone they knew in the household or family, while men were more affected by strangers, friends and co-workers. Young adults were consistently the most negatively affected across the majority of types of harm.

CONCLUSIONS:

Substantial proportions of Australians are affected by other people's drinking, including that of their families, friends, co-workers and strangers. These harms range in magnitude from noise and fear to physical abuse, sexual coercion and social isolation.

[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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