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Am J Drug Alcohol Abuse. 2011 May;37(3):141-7. doi: 10.3109/00952990.2010.538943. Epub 2011 Mar 28.

A pilot assessment of relapse prevention for heroin addicts in a Chinese rehabilitation center.

Author information

1
Shanghai Mental Health Center, Shanghai Jiao Tong University School of Medicine, Shanghai, China. drzhaomin@sh163.net

Abstract

OBJECTIVES:

To conduct a pilot assessment of relapse prevention (RP) group therapy for heroin-dependent patients in a drug rehabilitation center in China.

METHODS:

A randomized case-control study was conducted to assess the efficacy of RP delivered over a 2-month period to male heroin addicts (n = 50, RP group) in the Shanghai Labor Drug Rehabilitation Center (LDRC) compared with an equal number of participants (n = 50, labor rehabilitation (LR) group) in the LDRC program receiving standard-of-care treatment. Outcomes were assessed by the Beck Depression Inventory (BDI), the Self-Rating Anxiety Scale (SAS), the Self-Efficacy Scale (SE), and the Self-Esteem Scale (SES) after completion of RP, and by the Addiction Severity Index (ASI) and abstinence rates of heroin use at 3-month follow-up post release from the LDRC for both groups.

RESULTS:

Significant improvements in scores on SAS, SE, and SES were found in the RP group after completion of the 2-month RP group therapy compared with the LR group (SAS 7.85 ± 6.20 vs 1.07 ± 5.42, SE 3.88 ± 3.60 vs .08 ± 2.89, and SES 3.83 ± 3.31 vs .78 ± 2.55). At 3-month follow-up, the RP group participants had more improvements on ASI scores in most domains and had higher abstinence rates than that in the LR group (37.2% vs 16.7%).

CONCLUSIONS:

An RP component can be effective in increasing abstinence rates among post-program heroin-dependent individuals and may help reduce anxiety and improve self-esteem and self-efficacy during and following treatment.

SCIENTIFIC SIGNIFICANCE:

This study suggests RP as a potentially effective component of treatment for heroin addicts.

PMID:
21438799
PMCID:
PMC3113608
DOI:
10.3109/00952990.2010.538943
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article
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