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Midwifery. 2012 Apr;28(2):222-7. doi: 10.1016/j.midw.2011.01.004. Epub 2011 Mar 21.

Chinese family adaptation during the postpartum period and its influencing factors: A questionnaire survey.

Author information

1
Peking University School of Nursing, #38 Xueyuan Road, Hai Dian District, Beijing, PR China. luhong@bjmu.edu.cn

Abstract

AIM:

this study aimed to explore new parents' views and experiences during their transition to parenthood.

BACKGROUND:

in China the one-child birth policy may bring more stress and challenges for the new parents due to the lack of experience and greater expectations of their new role. China is also at a stage of rapid economic and social development which creates new conditions for parenthood.

METHODS:

a cross-sectional survey was conducted from February to September 2009 among 232 mothers and fathers, yielding a 83.6% response rate (n=194 couples). The questionnaire included: the Family Assessment Device-General Function Scale, the Family Resources Scale, the Family Adaptation Scale, and the Chinese Perceived Stress Scale.

RESULTS:

there were no significant differences between mothers' adaptation and fathers' adaptation during the postpartum period, as well as their perceived stress, family function and family resources (p>0.05). Method of childbirth was not related to adaptation. About 29% of variance in mothers' adaptation could be explained by satisfaction with the infant's gender (B=0.295, p<0.001), fathers' adaptation (B=0.236, p<0.001), and family resources (B=0.179, p=0.016). About 42% of variance in fathers' adaptation could be explained by mothers' adaptation (B=0.268, p<0.001), satisfaction with marriage (B=0.248, p=0.002), satisfaction with the infant's gender (B=0.209, p<0.007), and family resources (B=0.206, p=0.002).

CONCLUSION:

this study highlights the importance of family resources to family adaptation and antenatal and postnatal education programmes as part of family-centred care. The possible influences of culture and policies need to be considered by health-care professionals developing strategies to facilitate family adaptation to the early parenthood.

PMID:
21419534
DOI:
10.1016/j.midw.2011.01.004
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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