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Curr Opin Organ Transplant. 2011 Apr;16(2):243-9. doi: 10.1097/MOT.0b013e3283447b1c.

Racial disparities in organ donation and why.

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1
Division of Transplant Surgery, Department of Surgery, Medical University of South Carolina, Clinical Science Building Suite 409, 96 Jonathan Lucas Street, Charleston, South Carolina 29425, USA.

Abstract

PURPOSE OF REVIEW:

High prevalence of comorbidities such as diabetes, hypertension, obesity, hepatitis B and C, in minority groups, results in racial minorities being disproportionally represented on transplant waiting lists. Organ transplantation positively impacts patient survival but greater access is limited by a severe donor shortage.

RECENT FINDINGS:

Unfortunately, minority groups also suffer from disparities in deceased and living donation. African-Americans comprise 12.9% of the population and 34% of the kidney transplant waiting list but only 13.8% of deceased donors. Barriers to minority deceased donation include: decreased awareness of transplantation, religious or cultural distrust of the medical community, fear of medical abandonment and fear of racism. Furthermore, African-Americans comprise only 11.8% of living donors. Barriers to minority living donation include: unwillingness to donate, medical comorbid conditions, trust or fear of medical community, loss to follow-up, poor coping mechanisms, financial concerns, reluctance to ask family members and friends, fear of surgery, and lack of awareness about living donor kidney transplantation.

SUMMARY:

Transplant center-based education classes significantly and positively impact African-American concerns and beliefs surrounding living donation. Community and national strategies utilizing culturally sensitive communication and interventions can ameliorate disparities and improve access to transplantation.

PMID:
21415828
DOI:
10.1097/MOT.0b013e3283447b1c
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
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