Format

Send to

Choose Destination
J Ambul Care Manage. 2011 Apr-Jun;34(2):113-25. doi: 10.1097/JAC.0b013e31820ef605.

Does integrated care improve treatment for depression? A systematic review.

Author information

1
Minnesota Evidence-based Practice Center, University of Minnesota School of Public Health, Minneapolis, Minnesota, USA. butl0092@umn.edu

Abstract

Care management-based interventions promoting integrated care by combining primary care with mental health services in a coordinated and colocated manner are increasingly popular; yet, the benefits of specific approaches are not well established. We conducted a systematic review of integrated care trials in US primary care settings to assess whether the level of integration of provider roles or care process affects clinical outcomes. Although most trials showed positive effects, the degree of integration was not significantly related to depression outcomes. Integrated care appears to improve depression management in primary care patients, but questions remain about its specific form and implementation.

PMID:
21415610
DOI:
10.1097/JAC.0b013e31820ef605
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

Supplemental Content

Full text links

Icon for Wolters Kluwer
Loading ...
Support Center