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Public Health Nutr. 2011 Oct;14(10):1736-42. doi: 10.1017/S1368980011000358. Epub 2011 Mar 18.

The number of 24 h dietary recalls using the US Department of Agriculture's automated multiple-pass method required to estimate nutrient intake in overweight and obese adults.

Author information

1
Agricultural Research Service, US Department of Agriculture, Beltsville Human Nutrition Research Center, Beltsville, MD, USA. Kim.Stote@esc.edu

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

To determine the number of 24 h dietary recalls required to adequately estimate nutrient intake in overweight and obese adults using the US Department of Agriculture's (USDA) automated multiple-pass method (AMPM). In addition, the study quantified sources of variation in dietary intake, such as day of the week, season, sequence of diet interviews (training effect), diet interviewer, body weight and within- and between-subject variances in the intake of selected nutrients.

DESIGN:

Adults having a BMI of ≥ 28 but <38 kg/m2 were included in the study. The USDA's AMPM was used to obtain 24 h dietary recalls every 10 d for 6 months. Dietary intake data were analysed to adequately estimate the number of 24 h recalls necessary to assess nutrient intake. Variance component estimates were made by using a mixed-model procedure.

SETTING:

The greater Washington, DC, metropolitan area.

SUBJECTS:

Adults (34 men and 39 women) aged 35-65 years.

RESULTS:

Overweight and obese adults completed fourteen 24 h dietary recalls. Utilizing within- and between-subject variances requires 5-10 and 12-15 d of 24 h dietary recalls in men and women, respectively, to estimate energy and macronutrient intakes in a 6-month period. Within- and between-subject variances were the major contributors to variance in nutrient intakes. Day of the week, season, sequence, diet interviewer and body weight had little impact on variance.

CONCLUSIONS:

This information is valuable for researchers planning to conduct studies on free-living individuals that include the collection of dietary intake data.

PMID:
21414246
DOI:
10.1017/S1368980011000358
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
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