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PLoS One. 2011 Mar 9;6(3):e17635. doi: 10.1371/journal.pone.0017635.

Neural circuitry of emotional and cognitive conflict revealed through facial expressions.

Author information

1
Department of Psychology, Washington University in St. Louis, St. Louis, Missouri, United States of America. kschiew@wustl.edu

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

Neural systems underlying conflict processing have been well studied in the cognitive realm, but the extent to which these overlap with those underlying emotional conflict processing remains unclear. A novel adaptation of the AX Continuous Performance Task (AX-CPT), a stimulus-response incompatibility paradigm, was examined that permits close comparison of emotional and cognitive conflict conditions, through the use of affectively-valenced facial expressions as the response modality.

METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS:

Brain activity was monitored with functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) during performance of the emotional AX-CPT. Emotional conflict was manipulated on a trial-by-trial basis, by requiring contextually pre-cued facial expressions to emotional probe stimuli (IAPS images) that were either affectively compatible (low-conflict) or incompatible (high-conflict). The emotion condition was contrasted against a matched cognitive condition that was identical in all respects, except that probe stimuli were emotionally neutral. Components of the brain cognitive control network, including dorsal anterior cingulate cortex (ACC) and lateral prefrontal cortex (PFC), showed conflict-related activation increases in both conditions, but with higher activity during emotion conditions. In contrast, emotion conflict effects were not found in regions associated with affective processing, such as rostral ACC.

CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE:

These activation patterns provide evidence for a domain-general neural system that is active for both emotional and cognitive conflict processing. In line with previous behavioural evidence, greatest activity in these brain regions occurred when both emotional and cognitive influences additively combined to produce increased interference.

PMID:
21408006
PMCID:
PMC3052361
DOI:
10.1371/journal.pone.0017635
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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