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J Theor Biol. 2012 Apr 21;299:172-9. doi: 10.1016/j.jtbi.2011.03.004. Epub 2011 Mar 12.

The promise of Mechanical Turk: how online labor markets can help theorists run behavioral experiments.

Author information

1
Program for Evolutionary Dynamics, Harvard University, Cambridge MA 02138, USA. drand@fas.harvard.edu

Abstract

Combining evolutionary models with behavioral experiments can generate powerful insights into the evolution of human behavior. The emergence of online labor markets such as Amazon Mechanical Turk (AMT) allows theorists to conduct behavioral experiments very quickly and cheaply. The process occurs entirely over the computer, and the experience is quite similar to performing a set of computer simulations. Thus AMT opens the world of experimentation to evolutionary theorists. In this paper, I review previous work combining theory and experiments, and I introduce online labor markets as a tool for behavioral experimentation. I review numerous replication studies indicating that AMT data is reliable. I also present two new experiments on the reliability of self-reported demographics. In the first, I use IP address logging to verify AMT subjects' self-reported country of residence, and find that 97% of responses are accurate. In the second, I compare the consistency of a range of demographic variables reported by the same subjects across two different studies, and find between 81% and 98% agreement, depending on the variable. Finally, I discuss limitations of AMT and point out potential pitfalls. I hope this paper will encourage evolutionary modelers to enter the world of experimentation, and help to strengthen the bond between theoretical and empirical analyses of the evolution of human behavior.

PMID:
21402081
DOI:
10.1016/j.jtbi.2011.03.004
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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