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Stem Cells Dev. 2011 Dec;20(12):2077-91. doi: 10.1089/scd.2010.0420. Epub 2011 Jun 1.

Nasal septum-derived multipotent progenitors: a potent source for stem cell-based regenerative medicine.

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1
Stem Cell Biology Department, Stem Cell Technology Research Center, Tehran, Iran.

Abstract

Thus far, autologous adult stem cells have attracted great attention for clinical purposes. In this study, we aimed at identifying and comprehensively characterizing a subpopulation of multipotent cells within human nasal septal cartilage. We also conducted a comparative investigation with other well-established stem cells such as bone marrow-mesenchymal stem cells, adipose tissue-mesenchymal stem cells, and unrestricted somatic stem cells. The isolated clonal population was characterized using immunofluorescence, flow cytometry, reverse transcriptase, and real-time polymerase chain reaction. Nasal septal progenitors (NSP) expressed critical pluripotency and mesoectodermal stem cell markers. They also shared many characteristics with MSC in expression of CD90, CD105, CD106, CD166, and HLA-ABC and lack of expression of CD34, CD45, and HLA-DR. NSP distinctly presented CD133 (Prominin-1). These cells could proliferate rapidly in vitro with a higher clonogenic potential and showed a longer lifespan than other studied cells. This population bears some other multipotent properties in showing a high capacity to be differentiated into other lineages including chondrocytes, osteocytes, and neural-like cell types. Another strong/positive feature of this population was their ability to be safely expanded ex vivo with no susceptibility to chromosomal abnormality or tumorigenicity both in vitro and in vivo. In conclusion, NSP could be considered as an alternative autologous cell source that can bring them to the top of therapeutic applications.

PMID:
21401444
DOI:
10.1089/scd.2010.0420
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
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