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J Eval Clin Pract. 2012 Jun;18(3):689-94. doi: 10.1111/j.1365-2753.2011.01650.x. Epub 2011 Mar 13.

Post-stroke aphasia prognosis: a review of patient-related and stroke-related factors.

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1
Department of Communication Sciences and Disorders, College of Behavioral and Community Sciences, University of South Florida, Tampa, FL, USA.

Abstract

RATIONALE, AIMS AND OBJECTIVES:

Recovery of language function in individuals with post-stroke aphasia is associated with a variety of patient and stroke-related indices. Amidst a complex interaction of a multitude of variables, clinicians are faced with the arduous challenge of predicting aphasia recovery patterns and subsequently, long-term outcomes in these individuals. Unfortunately, predictive factors are highly variable making prognosis of aphasia recovery difficult. Therefore, the objective of this review was to assess the influence of patient-related and stroke-related factors on language recovery in individuals with post-stroke aphasia.

METHODS:

We completed a literature review to assess and identify evidence-based patient and stroke-related variables shown to be influential in aphasia recovery.

RESULTS:

A range of patient-related (gender, handedness, age, education, socio-economic status and intelligence) and stroke-related indices (initial severity, lesion site and lesion size) were identified as potential influential factors to post-stroke aphasia recovery. Initial severity of aphasia emerged as the factor most predictive of long-term aphasia recovery. Other influential factors of post-stroke language recovery included lesion site and size.

CONCLUSIONS:

Stroke-related factors, including aphasia severity, lesion site and lesion size, appear most critical to post-stroke aphasia recovery. The findings presented in this review offer clinicians an evidenced-based framework to assist in prediction of post-stroke aphasia recovery patterns and subsequent long-term functional communication outcomes.

[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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