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Phytother Res. 2011 Nov;25(11):1586-95. doi: 10.1002/ptr.3448. Epub 2011 Mar 11.

Protective effect of dietary tocotrienols against infection and inflammation-induced hyperlipidemia: an in vivo and in silico study.

Author information

1
Department of Biochemistry, J N Medical College, A M University, Aligarh, 202002, India; Department of Biotechnology, Integral University, Lucknow 226026, India. contactskhan@gmail.com

Abstract

Currently used hypolipidemic drugs, Fluvastatin and Atorvastatin, act via inhibiting the rate-limiting enzyme 3-hydroxy-3-methyl-glutaryl-coenzyme A (HMG-CoA) reductase of the mevalonate pathway. The associated severe side-effects of these statins led us to explore the therapeutic potentials of naturally occurring Tocomin (mixture of dietary α-, β-, γ- and δ-tocotrienols). Tocomin (10 mg) was orally administered daily for 10 days before and 12 h after bacterial lipopolysaccharide (200 μg) or 24 h after zymosan (20 mg) or turpentine (0.5 mL) to Syrian hamsters. The data showed that Tocomin significantly reduced the levels of plasma and lipoprotein lipids, cholesterol, apoB, small dense (sd)-LDL as well as LDL in the hyperlipidemia-induced hamsters. Further, the mechanism of action of α-, β-, γ- and δ-tocotrienols was validated by docking studies with HMG-CoA reductase enzyme using the Molegro Virtual Docker. The inhibition of HMG-CoA reductase predicted in terms of MolDockScore and interaction energy suggest the comparative potential in the descending order: Atorvastatin > Fluvastatin ~ δ > γ > β > α. The results favor the daily intake of naturally occurring tocotrienols as dietary supplement in the prevention and treatment of infection/inflammation induced dyslipidemia compared with the hypolipidemic drugs.

PMID:
21394808
DOI:
10.1002/ptr.3448
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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