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J Biochem. 2011 May;149(5):529-38. doi: 10.1093/jb/mvr025. Epub 2011 Mar 9.

Contribution of sams-1 and pmt-1 to lipid homoeostasis in adult Caenorhabditis elegans.

Author information

1
Department of Biochemistry, College of Life Science and Biotechnology, World Class University Program of Graduate School, Yonsei Proteome Research Center, Yonsei University, 134 Shinchon-dong, Sudaemoon-ku, Seoul, 120-749, Korea.

Abstract

Accumulation of lipids inside the cell is primarily caused by disorders of lipid metabolism. S-adenosylmethionine synthetase (SAMS) produces SAM, an important methyl donor in various phospholipid methyltransferase reactions catalysed by phosphoethanolamine N-methyltransferase (PMT-1). A gel-based, quantitative proteomic analysis of the RNA interference (RNAi)-mediated inactivation of the pod-2 gene, which encodes acetyl-CoA carboxylase, showed a substantial down-regulation of SAMS-1. Consequently, RNAi of either sams-1 or pmt-1 caused a significant increase in lipid droplet size in the intestine of Caenorhabditis elegans. Lipid droplets exhibited increased triacylglycerol (TG) and decreased phosphatidylcholine (PC) levels, suggesting a reciprocal relationship between TG and PC regulation. These lipid-associated phenotypes were rescued by choline feeding. Among the five fat metabolism-related genes examined, two genes were highly induced by inactivation of sams-1 or pmt-1: pod-2 and stearoyl-CoA desaturase (fat-7). Thus, both SAMS-1 and PMT-1 were shown to contribute to the homoeostasis of TG and PC levels in C. elegans, which would provide an important survival strategy under harsh environmental conditions.

PMID:
21389045
DOI:
10.1093/jb/mvr025
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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