Format

Send to

Choose Destination
Gynecol Oncol. 2011 Jun 1;121(3):462-5. doi: 10.1016/j.ygyno.2011.02.010. Epub 2011 Mar 9.

Ovarian cancer linked to Lynch syndrome typically presents as early-onset, non-serous epithelial tumors.

Author information

1
HNPCC-register, Department of Gastroenterology, Faculty of Health Sciences, Hvidovre University Hospital, Copenhagen University, Kettegård allé, Hvidovre, Denmark.

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

Heredity is a major cause of ovarian cancer and during recent years the contribution from germline mismatch repair (MMR) gene mutations linked to Lynch syndrome has gradually been recognized.

METHODS:

We characterized clinical features, tumor morphology and mismatch repair defects in all ovarian cancers identified in Swedish and Danish Lynch syndrome families.

RESULTS:

In total, 63 epithelial ovarian cancers developed at mean 48 (range 30-79) years of age with 47% being early stage (FIGO stage I). Histologically, endometrioid (35%) and clear cell (17%) tumors were overrepresented. The underlying MMR gene mutations in these families affected MSH2 in 49%, MSH6 in 33% and MLH1 in 17%. Immunohistochemical loss of the corresponding MMR protein was demonstrated in 33/36 (92%) tumors analyzed.

CONCLUSION:

The combined data from our cohorts demonstrate that ovarian cancer associated with Lynch syndrome typically presents at young age as early-stage, non-serous tumors, which implicates that a family history of colorectal and endometrial cancer should be specifically considered in such cases.

PMID:
21388660
DOI:
10.1016/j.ygyno.2011.02.010
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

Supplemental Content

Full text links

Icon for Elsevier Science
Loading ...
Support Center