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Public Health Nutr. 2011 Jun;14(6):1055-63. doi: 10.1017/S1368980010003587. Epub 2011 Mar 9.

Feasibility of innovative dietary assessment in epidemiological studies using the approach of combining different assessment instruments.

Author information

1
Department of Epidemiology, German Institute of Human Nutrition Potsdam-Rehbruecke, Nuthetal, Germany. anne-kathrin.illner@dife.de

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

To assess the feasibility of combining short-term and long-term dietary assessment instruments as new concept for improving usual dietary intake assessment on the individual level.

DESIGN:

Feasibility study of completing three 24 h dietary recalls (24-HDR) and a self-administered food propensity questionnaire (FPQ). The 24-HDR was conducted by monthly telephone interviews, using EPIC-SOFT software. The FPQ was completely standardized across cohorts and offered either as a web-based tool or in paper format.

SETTING:

Random sample derived from five ongoing European cohort studies (EPIC-San Sebastian, EPIC-Florence, EPIC-Potsdam, Estonia Genome Center (EGC) and Norwegian Women and Cancer study (NOWAC)).

SUBJECTS:

A total of 400 participants.

RESULTS:

Overall, the total participation rate for the present study was 65.3 % (n 261). On average, completion of the 24-HDR was highest for the first 24-HDR (63.0 %) and decreased slightly for the second (60.3 %) and third 24-HDR (56.3 %). The proportions of selecting the web-based FPQ varied among the study centres, with the highest in EGC (92.9 %) and NOWAC (70.0 %) and the lowest in EPIC-San Sebastian (25.5 %) and EPIC-Potsdam (33.9 %). Web users rarely requested support and were younger and more highly educated than those who completed the paper format.

CONCLUSIONS:

The present study supports the feasibility of a combined application of three 24-HDR and an FPQ in culturally different populations. The varying acceptance of the web-based instrument across populations requires a flexible application of assessment instruments.

PMID:
21385523
DOI:
10.1017/S1368980010003587
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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