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Aten Primaria. 2011 Sep;43(9):474-81. doi: 10.1016/j.aprim.2010.09.009. Epub 2011 Mar 5.

[Use of health resources and loss of productivity in gastroesophageal reflux disease: results of a cross-sectional study in a primary care setting in Spain].

[Article in Spanish]

Author information

1
Departamento Médico, AstraZeneca Farmacéutica Spain, S.A., España. javier.nuevo@astrazeneca.com

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

To evaluate healthcare resource use and productivity in patients with gastro-esophageal reflux disease (GERD) and the influence of disease severity on these two factors.

DESIGN:

Sub-analysis of the Spanish population of a multinational study with a 4-month retrospective period for the identification and selection of patients, and a clinical visit to obtain clinical information and data on use of healthcare resources, carried out between October 2007 and January 2008.

POPULATION:

A total of 477 patients attending a Primary Care centre, with a medical consultation for GERD.

MAIN VARIABLES:

Use of healthcare resources, changes in productivity based on the Work Productivity and Activity Impairment Questionnaire for GERD patients (WPAI-GERD).

RESULTS:

Despite having received pharmacological treatment at the baseline visit, after a median of 5.1 months follow-up (range 2.1-8.1), up to 15.9% (95% CI; 12.8-19.5) patients still showed clinically relevant GERD symptoms. Direct medical costs per year associated with diagnostic tests and medical consultations in patients with or without clinically relevant GERD symptoms were 666 € (SD: 2,097 €) and 370 € (SD: 2,060 €), respectively. The mean annual cost of reduced productivity (17%) was 5,316 € (SD: 8,615 €). This cost was 4 times higher for patients with clinically relevant GERD symptoms than for patients with no relevant symptoms (15,188 € [SD: 11,206 €] vs 3,926 € [SD: 7,232 €]).

CONCLUSION:

Patients with GERD use significant healthcare resources, attributable to associated medical costs and marked reduction in productivity, even though they receive pharmacological treatment.

PMID:
21382650
DOI:
10.1016/j.aprim.2010.09.009
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
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