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Diabetes Res Clin Pract. 2011 Jul;93(1):1-9. doi: 10.1016/j.diabres.2011.02.002. Epub 2011 Mar 5.

Barriers to diabetes management: patient and provider factors.

Author information

1
Johns Hopkins University, School of Nursing, Department of Health Systems and Outcomes, 525 North Wolfe Street, Baltimore, MD 21205-2110, United States. soohnam@gmail.com

Abstract

Despite significant advances in diagnosis and treatment, the persistence of inadequate metabolic control continues. Poor glycemic control may be reflected by both the failure of diabetes self-management by patients as well as inadequate intervention strategies by clinicians. The purpose of this systematic review is to summarize existing knowledge regarding various barriers of diabetes management from the perspectives of both patients and clinicians. A search of PubMed, CINAHL, ERIC, and PsycINFO identified 1454 articles in English published between 1990 and 2009, addressing type 2 diabetes, patient's barriers, clinician's barriers, and self-management. Patients' adherence, attitude, beliefs, and knowledge about diabetes may affect diabetes self-management. Culture and language capabilities influence the patient's health beliefs, attitudes, health literacy, thereby affecting diabetes self-management. Other influential factors include the patient's financial resources, co-morbidities, and social support. Clinician's attitude, beliefs and knowledge about diabetes also influence diabetes management. Clinicians may further influence the patient's perception through effective communication skills and by having a well-integrated health care system. Identifying barriers to diabetes management is necessary to improve the quality of diabetes care, including the improvement of metabolic control, and diabetes self-management. Further research that considers these barriers is necessary for developing interventions for individuals with type 2 diabetes.

PMID:
21382643
DOI:
10.1016/j.diabres.2011.02.002
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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