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J Perinatol. 2011 Nov;31(11):722-9. doi: 10.1038/jp.2011.17. Epub 2011 Mar 3.

Relationship between cerebrovascular dysautoregulation and arterial blood pressure in the premature infant.

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1
Department of Pediatrics, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD, USA.

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

To evaluate cerebrovascular autoregulation as a function of arterial blood pressure (ABP) in the critically ill, premature infant.

STUDY DESIGN:

A prospective observational pilot study was conducted in two tertiary care Neonatal Intensive-Care Units. Premature infants (n=23, ≤30 weeks estimated gestational age with invasive ABP monitoring) were enrolled and received routine care while undergoing continuous autoregulation monitoring, using the cerebral oximetry index (COx). The COx is a moving, linear correlation coefficient between cortical reflectance oximetry and ABP. COx values were stratified as a function of ABP for individual subject recordings and for the cohort.

RESULT:

The mean duration of autoregulation monitoring was 3.2 days (median: 2.97, range: 0.61-3.99). A total of 10 of 23 (43%) developed intraventricular hemorrhage and 1 of 23 (4%) developed periventricular leukomalacia by head ultrasound. No association was found between neurologic injury and percentage of the monitoring periods with autoregulation impairment (defined as COx>0.5). Lower ABP was associated with dysautoregulation (higher COx values, P<0.01). The percentage of time with impaired autoregulation was greater with lower ABP (P=0.013, Spearman r=0.51).

CONCLUSION:

All infants studied had periods with intact and periods with impaired cerebrovascular autoregulation, measured with the COx. Low ABP was associated with impaired autoregulation.

PMID:
21372795
DOI:
10.1038/jp.2011.17
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
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