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Child Neuropsychol. 2011;17(4):347-67. doi: 10.1080/09297049.2010.544647.

Neurocognitive profiles of preterm infants randomly assigned to lower or higher hematocrit thresholds for transfusion.

Author information

1
Department of Pediatrics, University of Iowa, Iowa City, IA 52245, USA. mccoyt@healthcare.uiowa.edu

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

Preterm infants are frequently transfused with red blood cells based on standardized guidelines or clinical concerns that anemia taxes infants' physiological compensatory mechanisms and thereby threatens their health and well-being. The impact of various transfusion guidelines on long-term neurocognitive outcome is not known. The purpose of this study is to evaluate long-term neurocognitive outcome on children born prematurely and treated at birth with different transfusion guidelines.

METHODS:

Neurocognitive outcomes were examined at school age for 56 preterm infants randomly assigned to a liberal (n = 33) or restrictive (n = 23) transfusion strategy. Tests of intelligence, achievement, language, visual-spatial/motor, and memory skills were administered. Between-group differences were assessed.

RESULTS:

Those in the liberal transfusion group performed more poorly than those in the restrictive group on measures of associative verbal fluency, visual memory, and reading.

CONCLUSIONS:

Findings highlight possible long-term neurodevelopmental consequences of maintaining higher hematocrit levels.

PMID:
21360360
PMCID:
PMC3115491
DOI:
10.1080/09297049.2010.544647
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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