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J Thromb Thrombolysis. 2011 Jul;32(1):96-102. doi: 10.1007/s11239-010-0548-3.

Early stroke-related deep venous thrombosis: risk factors and influence on outcome.

Author information

1
2nd Department of Neurology, Institute of Psychiatry and Neurology, Warsaw, Poland. jbembenek@o2.pl

Abstract

Deep venous thrombosis (DVT) is a serious complication of various medical conditions including acute stroke. Our aim was to identify the occurrence of early stroke-related DVT, risk factors for its development and the influence on outcome. The study involved consecutive patients admitted to our center due to acute ischaemic (n = 278) or haemorrhagic (n = 12) stroke during a 16-month period. We collected data on their pre-stroke health status, neurological deficit on admission and baseline serum CRP and fibrinogen level. Ultrasonographic imaging was performed at the 3rd (IQR: 2-4) and 9th (IQR: 8-9) day after stroke. Patients thrombosis occurring between the first and second examination comprised the newly developed early stroke-related DVT group. We found DVT in 8.0% (24/299) of patients at initial evaluation. Newly developed DVT was present in 3.0% (9/299) of patients, and was predominantly distal (7 of 9 cases). It was associated with elevated serum CRP level (OR 8.75; 95%CI: 1.61-47.6), which was verified in a model adjusted for stroke severity and pre-stroke dependency (3-5 pts. in mRS). In a multivariate model, newly developed DVT significantly increased the risk of 3-month mortality (OR 12.4; 95%CI: 1.72-89.4), without affecting the combined risk of dependency and death (OR 2.57; 95%CI: 0.39-17.0). Early stroke-related DVT is an infrequent complication. However, it may be an independent risk factor for 3-month mortality. Increased serum CRP level combined with normal fibrinogen level seems predictive for development of DVT. It may be reasonable to provide those patients with additional DVT prophylaxis.

PMID:
21359647
PMCID:
PMC3111553
DOI:
10.1007/s11239-010-0548-3
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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