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Diagn Microbiol Infect Dis. 2011 Mar;69(3):307-13. doi: 10.1016/j.diagmicrobio.2010.10.026.

Prevalence of antimicrobial resistant pathogens from blood cultures from Canadian hospitals: results of the CANWARD 2007-2009 study.

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1
Department of Microbiology, Health Sciences Centre/Diagnostic Services of Manitoba, Winnipeg, Manitoba R3A 1R9, Canada. hadam@hsc.mb.ca

Abstract

This study assessed the epidemiology and antimicrobial resistance of pathogens associated with bloodstream infections in Canadian hospitals between 2007 and 2009. Tertiary-care medical centers representing 8 of 10 Canadian provinces submitted bloodstream infection pathogens from patients attending hospital clinics, emergency rooms, medical/surgical wards, and intensive care units. Over 8,000 blood culture pathogens were collected. The 10 most common pathogens (representing 80.9% of all isolates) were Escherichia coli (1856 [22.6%]), Staphylococcus aureus (1457 [17.7%] including 1101 methicillin-susceptible Staphylococcus aureus and 356 methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus), coagulase-negative staphylococci (907 [11.0%]), Klebsiella pneumoniae (600 [7.3%]), Streptococcus pneumoniae (470 [5.7%]), Enterococcus faecalis (360 [4.4%]), Pseudomonas aeruginosa (333 [4.0%]), viridans group streptococci (321 [3.9%]), Enterobacter cloacae (193 [2.3%]), and Streptococcus pyogenes (159 [1.9%]). The most active agents against Gram-negative bacilli were carbapenems (e.g., meropenem and ertapenem) and piperacillin-tazobactam, while for Gram-positive cocci, they were vancomycin, linezolid, and daptomycin.

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