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Drug Alcohol Depend. 2011 May 1;115(1-2):131-6. doi: 10.1016/j.drugalcdep.2011.01.018. Epub 2011 Feb 25.

Prevalence and correlates of waterpipe tobacco smoking by college students in North Carolina.

Author information

1
Department of Social Sciences and Health Policy, Wake Forest University School of Medicine, Winston-Salem, NC 27157, United States. ESutfin@wfubmc.edu

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

Known most commonly in the U.S. as "hookah," waterpipe tobacco smoking appears to be growing among college students. Despite beliefs that waterpipe use is safer than cigarette smoking, research to date (albeit limited) has found health risks of waterpipe smoking are similar to those associated with cigarette smoking, including lung cancer, respiratory illness, and periodontal disease. The goals of this study were to estimate the prevalence of use among a large, multi-institution sample of college students and identify correlates of waterpipe use, including other health-risk behaviors (i.e., cigarette smoking, alcohol, marijuana, and other illicit drug use) and availability of commercial waterpipe tobacco smoking venues.

METHODS:

A cross-sectional sample of 3770 college students from eight universities in North Carolina completed a web-based survey in fall 2008.

RESULTS:

Forty percent of the sample reported ever having smoked tobacco from a waterpipe, and 17% reported current (past 30-day) waterpipe tobacco smoking. Correlates associated with current waterpipe use included demographic factors (male gender, freshman class); other health-risk behaviors (daily and nondaily cigarette smoking, alcohol use, marijuana use, other illicit drug use); perceiving waterpipe tobacco smoking as less harmful than regular cigarettes; and having a commercial waterpipe venue near campus.

CONCLUSIONS:

The results highlight the popularity of waterpipe tobacco smoking among college students and underscore the need for more research to assess the public health implications of this growing trend.

PMID:
21353750
PMCID:
PMC3089695
DOI:
10.1016/j.drugalcdep.2011.01.018
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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