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Appetite. 2011 Jun;56(3):621-8. doi: 10.1016/j.appet.2011.02.014. Epub 2011 Feb 23.

Energy intake and appetite following netball exercise over 5 days in trained 13-15 year old girls.

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1
School of Life Sciences, Department of Sport and Exercise Sciences, Northumbria University, Northumberland Building, Newcastle upon Tyne, NE1 8ST, UK. penny.rumbold@northumbria.ac.uk

Abstract

Free-living energy intake and subjective appetite were monitored in a group of eleven 13-15-year old trained adolescent netball players. During preliminary visits, a FLEX heart rate calibration and resting metabolic test were conducted. Heart rate data were collected during a netball exercise session and sedentary period and during the waking hours of all study days, to enable exercise-induced and 24-h energy expenditure to be quantified. The girls completed two 5-day treatment weeks, interspersed with a 2-week 'wash out' period. A 47-min bout of netball exercise or an equivalent sedentary period was carried out on day 3 of each treatment week. Energy intake was measured over each 5-day period using a combined self-reported, weighed, food diary and 24-h recall interview technique. Subjective appetite (hunger, prospective food consumption, fullness) and mood were rated by subjects immediately before and after meals each day, and before and after the netball exercise and the sedentary period. Forty eight hour energy intake was significantly higher following the netball exercise compared to the sedentary period. The girls felt significantly more hungry immediately following the netball exercise compared to immediately before. In conclusion, a single intermittent exercise bout alters subsequent appetite and energy intake in trained 13-15-year old girls.

PMID:
21352880
DOI:
10.1016/j.appet.2011.02.014
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
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