Format

Send to

Choose Destination
See comment in PubMed Commons below
Early Interv Psychiatry. 2008 Nov;2(4):277-84. doi: 10.1111/j.1751-7893.2008.00089.x.

Prospective outcome of early intervention for individuals at ultra-high-risk for psychosis.

Author information

1
Department of Psychiatry, Seoul National University, College of Medicine, Clinical Cognitive Neuroscience Center, Neuroscience Institute, SNU-MRC, Chongno-gu, Seoul, Korea.

Abstract

AIM:

Based on previous reports of second-generation antipsychotic agents having a beneficial effect on prodromal symptoms, we investigated the effectiveness and tolerability of atypical antipsychotic therapies in individuals at high risk for developing psychosis.

METHODS:

We examined prodromal symptoms and functioning in individuals at ultra-high-risk for psychosis using an uncontrolled prospective design with pre- and post-treatment measures.

RESULTS:

Of the 27 subjects taking antipsychotics during the study period, 15 took part in at least one follow-up assessment. Overall Comprehensive Assessment of At-Risk Mental States scores significantly improved at the last evaluation point, with a medium-size effect of Cohen's d = 0.54 (95% confidence interval, -0.02 to 1.08) (mean follow-up period = 8.8; SD = 8.3 months). Depression and anxiety symptoms were markedly reduced, and global and social functioning also significantly improved. Of the 27 subjects, two (7.4%) converted to psychosis and 16 (59.3%) experienced at least one treatment-emergent adverse event, but no subjects exhibited serious adverse events.

CONCLUSIONS:

The results of this study support treating high-risk individuals with antipsychotics to reduce prodromal symptoms with adequate safety.

[Indexed for MEDLINE]
PubMed Commons home

PubMed Commons

0 comments
How to join PubMed Commons

    Supplemental Content

    Full text links

    Icon for Wiley
    Loading ...
    Support Center