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Early Interv Psychiatry. 2008 Nov;2(4):268-76. doi: 10.1111/j.1751-7893.2008.00088.x.

Parent attitudes and parent adolescent interaction in families of youth at risk for psychosis and with recent-onset psychotic symptoms.

Author information

1
Department of Psychiatry and Biobehavioral Sciences, Semel Institute for Neuroscience and Human Behavior, Brain Research Institute, University of California, Los Angeles, CA, USA. mpobrien@mednet.ucla.edu

Abstract

AIM:

This study investigated the behavioural correlates of caregiver attitudes among parents of youth at risk for psychosis and with recent-onset psychotic symptoms.

METHODS:

Forty adolescents identified as ultra-high-risk (UHR) for psychosis using the Structured Interview for Prodromal Syndromes, and their primary caregivers, participated in the Family Interaction Task (FIT), a 10-minute discussion of meaningful shared experiences that allowed families to demonstrate supportive as well as conflict-engaging behaviour. At the same assessment, caregivers were administered the Camberwell Family Interview (CFI). We examined cross-sectional relationships between these measures, as well as their association with youth symptom severity and functioning at 4-month follow-up.

RESULTS:

As predicted, caregivers who provided more positive remarks regarding their UHR and recent-onset adolescents during the CFI were also more likely to exhibit constructive behaviour during the FIT. Similarly, CFI critical comments were positively associated with caregivers' conflict-engaging behaviour during the FIT. Parents' positive remarks predicted a decrease in negative symptoms, and parent warmth predicted an increase in social functioning at follow-up assessment.

CONCLUSIONS:

The ability to maintain a constructive attitude and approach towards youth predicted symptomatic and functional improvement, and may be a teachable skill.

[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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