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Bundesgesundheitsblatt Gesundheitsforschung Gesundheitsschutz. 2011 Mar;54(3):357-64. doi: 10.1007/s00103-010-1234-5.

[Suspected adverse reactions after vaccination. Results from the German Health Interview and Examination Survey for Children and Adolescents. Part I: descriptive analyses].

[Article in German]

Author information

1
Abteilung für Epidemiologie und Gesundheitsberichterstattung, Fachgebiet Kinder- und Jugendgesundheit, Prävention, Robert Koch-Institut, Berlin, Germany. Poethko-MuellerC@rki.de

Abstract

The decreasing incidence of vaccine-preventable infectious diseases and their complications redirects public attention to the safety risks of vaccinations. Collation of resilient vaccine adverse reaction data from passive and active surveillance systems as well as epidemiological studies is indispensable. From 2003-2006, the representative National Health Interview and Examination Survey for Children and Adolescents ("Kinder- und Jugendgesundheitssurvey," KiGGS) retrospectively collected information about vaccines, vaccination dates, and suspected vaccine-related adverse events. A total of 15,958 participants (<17 years of age) were included in the analyses. Parents of 332 (2.1%; 95% CI 1.8-2.5) children and adolescents reported that one or more vaccinations were poorly tolerated. The reported adverse reactions were largely in accordance with information given in the summaries of product characteristics of the respective vaccines. Calculated rates of adverse reactions were below the known rates. KiGGS allowed the retrospective collection of suspected adverse reactions from a large number of vaccinations, thereby providing data even on rare adverse events. No unusual pattern was observed. The information obtained on suspected adverse reactions does not change the positive benefit-risk ratio of vaccinations.

PMID:
21347769
DOI:
10.1007/s00103-010-1234-5
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
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