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Eur J Clin Microbiol Infect Dis. 2011 Sep;30(9):1095-103. doi: 10.1007/s10096-011-1197-y. Epub 2011 Feb 24.

Resistance trends and in vitro activity of tigecycline and 17 other antimicrobial agents against Gram-positive and Gram-negative organisms, including multidrug-resistant pathogens, in Germany.

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1
Antiinfectives Intelligence GmbH, Campus Hochschule Bonn-Rhein-Sieg, Von-Liebig-Straße 20, 53359 Rheinbach, Germany.

Abstract

To document the development of resistance to tigecycline in comparison with 17 other antimicrobials, the susceptibilities of 2,741 isolates comprising 16 bacterial species recovered from hospitalised patients in 15 German centres in 2009 were assessed. The results were compared with those of previous trials (German Tigecycline Evaluation Surveillance Trial, G-TEST I and II, performed in 2005 and 2007, respectively) conducted prior to and shortly after the introduction of tigecycline in Germany. Moreover, the in vitro activities of tigecycline against the subset of multidrug-resistant (MDR) pathogens recovered within all three sampling periods (n = 4,988) were evaluated in comparison to the corresponding non-MDR isolates. All susceptibility tests were performed by broth microdilution. Between 2005 and 2009, tigecycline retained its high activity against Gram-positive and Gram-negative organisms, including MDR pathogens. By contrast, an in part marked increase in resistance to broad-spectrum beta-lactams and fluoroquinolones was observed for many Enterobacteriaceae and for non-fermenting Gram-negative bacteria. Against a background of a steadily increasing number of multiresistant pathogens, the activity of tigecycline remained unaltered. With the exception of Acinetobacter isolates with decreased susceptibility to carbapenems, tigecycline's activity profile was not notably affected by organisms resistant to other drug classes and, thus, holds promise as an important therapeutic agent, particularly for situations in which MDR organisms are suspected.

PMID:
21347680
DOI:
10.1007/s10096-011-1197-y
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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