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Behav Res Ther. 2011 Apr;49(4):219-26. doi: 10.1016/j.brat.2011.01.006. Epub 2011 Jan 27.

The effectiveness of enhanced cognitive behavioural therapy for eating disorders: an open trial.

Author information

1
University of Western Australia School of Psychology, 35 Stirling Highway Crawley, 6009 Perth, Western Australia, Australia. sbyrne@psy.uwa.edu.au

Abstract

The aim of this study was to examine the effectiveness of Enhanced Cognitive Behaviour Therapy (CBT-E) for eating disorders in an open trial for adults with the full range of eating disorders found in the community. The only previously published trial of CBT-E for eating disorders was a randomised controlled trial (RCT) conducted in the U.K. for patients with a BMI ≥ 17.5. The current study represents the first published trial of CBT-E to include patients with a BMI<17.5. The study involved 125 patients referred to a public outpatient clinic in Perth, Western Australia. Patients attended, on average, 20-40 individual sessions with a clinical psychologist. Of those who entered the trial, 53% completed treatment. Longer waiting time for treatment was significantly associated with drop out. By the end of treatment full remission (cessation of all key eating disorder behaviours, BMI ≥ 18.5 kg/m(2), not meeting DSM-IV criteria for an eating disorder) or partial remission (meeting at least 2 these criteria) was achieved by two thirds of the patients who completed treatment and 40% of the total sample. The results compared favourably to those reported in the previous RCT of CBT-E, with one exception being the higher drop-out rate in the current study. Overall, the findings indicated that CBT-E results in significant improvements, in both eating and more general psychopathology, in patients with all eating disorders attending an outpatient clinic.

PMID:
21345418
DOI:
10.1016/j.brat.2011.01.006
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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