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Acta Orthop Traumatol Turc. 2010;44(5):385-91. doi: 10.3944/AOTT.2010.2348.

Foot mobility and plantar fascia elasticity in patients with plantar fasciitis.

Author information

1
Bursa Yüksek ‹htisas Training and Research Hospital, Department of Orthopedics and Traumatology, Bursa, Turkey. sahinnamik@yahoo.com

Abstract

OBJECTIVES:

In this study, we investigated the radiologic changes of feet in sagittal plane under weightbearing either with or without plantar fasciitis.

METHODS:

The study includes 64 feet of the 42 subjects with heel pain (Group 1: 32 women, 10 men, mean age 48 years, range 33-57 years) and 80 feet of the 40 patients (Group 2: 30 women, 10 men, mean age 47.2 years, range 35-56 years) without heel pain. Calcaneal inclination angle (CIA), calcaneal-first metatarsal angle (CMA), and plantar fascia length (PFL) were measured in the lateral radiographs of the weightbearing and non-weightbearing foot. The values of Group 1 and Group 2 were compared.

RESULTS:

The mean CIA was 26° (range 18-35°), CMA was 121° (range 115-133°), and PFL was 131 mm (range 110-158 mm) in non-weightbearing position for Group 1. The mean CIA was 27° (range 17-38°), CMA was 122° (range 110-135°), and PFL was 136 mm (range 120-155 mm) in non-weightbearing position for Group 2. The mean CIA was 13.6° (range 5-25°), CMA was 138° (range 130-153°), and PFU was 143.8 mm (range 118-158 mm) in weightbearing position for Group 1. The mean CIA was 9.9° (range 4-25°), CMA was 145° (range 130-155°), and PFU was 151.4 mm (range 137-167 mm) in weightbearing position for Group 2. The difference between CIA, CMA, and PFL values were -13°, 17°, and 12 mm under condition of weightbearing and nonweightbearing position values for Group 1; and -17°, 23°, and 15 mm for Group 2. The differences were significant between weightbearing and non-weightbearing position values (p<0.05).

CONCLUSION:

The reduced CIA, CMA, and PFL changes during weight bearing might show reduced foot mobility and plantar fascia elasticity, which may lead to posterior heel pain syndrome.

PMID:
21343689
DOI:
10.3944/AOTT.2010.2348
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
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